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  Toonami Infolink :: View topic - Dead Celebrity Roundup (2005-2006 Editon) :(
Toonami Turner Cartoon Network Thundercats Voltron Space Ghost Birdman Herculoids Dino Boy Galaxy Trio Mighty Mightor Moby Dick Shazzan The Impossibles Max Fleisher's Superman (a.k.a. Roulette) The Real Adventures of Johnny Quest Robotech Sailor Moon DragonBall Z Filmation Superman Batman Superfriends ReBoot Ronin Warriors G-Force Powerpuff Girls Batman: The Animated Series Gundam Wing Tenchi Muyo! Universe in Tokyo Superman Outlaw Star Big O CardCaptors Mobile Suit Gundam O8th MS Team DragonBall Batman Beyond Gundam 0080 Zoids: Zero Hamtaro Zoids: Chaotic Century Guardian Force G Gundam He-Man and the Masters of the Universe Transformers: Armada G.I. Joe .hack//Sign Yu Yu Hakusho Rurouni Kenshin QuickTime .mov MOV AVI .avi MPEG .mpg Movies movie Videos Clips Sounds articles rants essays images files CNX inner circle cn2 revolution Japan japanese multimedia saban funimation toei graz harmony gold mainframe Tyler Zogg TylerLToonami Turner Cartoon Network Thundercats Voltron Space Ghost Birdman Herculoids Dino Boy Galaxy Trio Mighty Mightor Moby Dick Shazzan The Impossibles Max Fleisher's Superman (a.k.a. Roulette) The Real Adventures of Johnny Quest Robotech Sailor Moon DragonBall Z Filmation Superman Batman Superfriends ReBoot Ronin Warriors G-Force Powerpuff Girls Batman: The Animated Series Gundam Wing Tenchi Muyo! Universe in Tokyo Superman Outlaw Star Big O CardCaptors Mobile Suit Gundam O8th MS Team DragonBall Batman Beyond Gundam 0080 Zoids: Zero Hamtaro Zoids: Chaotic Century Guardian Force G Gundam He-Man and the Masters of the Universe Transformers: Armada G.I. Joe .hack//Sign Yu Yu Hakusho Rurouni Kenshin QuickTime .mov MOV AVI .avi MPEG .mpg Movies movie Videos Clips Sounds articles rants essays images files CNX inner circle cn2 revolution Japan japanese multimedia saban funimation toei graz harmony gold mainframe Tyler Zogg TylerL
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Dead Celebrity Roundup (2005-2006 Editon) :(
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dougisfunny

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you must be keepin an eye on obituaries like a hawk...

that or given your age you could be the grim reaper
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The problem with America is stupidity. I'm not saying there should be a capital punishment for stupidity, but why don't we just take the safety labels off of everything and let the problem solve itself?
PostSat Jun 04, 2005 6:02 am
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Nobuyuki

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Maybe I should just stop reading the news, then...

Guitarist Domenic Troiano dies at 59
By Larry LeBlanc
Sat Jun 4, 1:01 AM ET

Canadian guitarist Domenic "Donnie" Troiano died May 25 at his home in Toronto after a long fight with cancer. He was 59.

Born in Modugno, Italy, and a naturalized Canadian since 1955, Troiano was a force in Canadian music for 40 years. He came to prominence with Toronto-based Robbie Lane & the Disciples, which backed up Arkansas rockabilly singer Ronnie Hawkins in the early '60s.

He later performed as a guitarist with the Five Rogues, the Mandala, Bush, the James Gang (replacing Joe Walsh) and the Guess Who, as well as his own Domenic Troiano Band. He also handled music supervision for films and TV, including the CBS TV shows "Night Heat," "Diamonds" and "Hot Shots."

"Domenic's contribution to Canadian music is unmeasurable," producer Bob Ezrin told Billboard. "He is one of the finest instrumentalists that Canada has ever produced. He has had an influence on every kid who picked up a guitar in Canada since he started playing."

Guess Who frontman Burton Cummings said, "The best time I remember with Domenic was when he came out and stayed with me in Winnipeg in 1975 ... I had my 100-year-old upright piano, he an acoustic guitar, and we'd drink strong espresso coffee. Those were tremendous times."

In demand for session work in the 1980s, Troiano appeared on recordings by Steely Dan, Diana Ross, Joe Cocker and David Clayton-Thomas. He was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame in 1996.


Jazz musician, activist Oscar Brown Jr. dies at 78
By Bill Holland
Sat Jun 4, 1:03 AM ET

Oscar Brown Jr. -- singer, composer, lyricist, playwright and black-culture activist -- died May 29 in Chicago from complications from a blood infection. He was 78.

Brown burst out of Chicago and onto the national music scene in 1960 as a vocalist with a jazz-tinged, theatrical approach, presented in a supple, finger-popping style. He quickly became one of the first artists of the civil rights era to open an unflinching window to the joy and pain of the black experience in America.

To younger music fans, he is best remembered as the hip, urbane narrator of the well-received PBS program "From Jump Street: The Story of Black Music" in the early '80s. Twenty years before, he also hosted Steve Allen's short-lived TV series "Jazz Scene U.S.A."

Brown made a series of well-received albums for Columbia Records in the early '60s, highlighted by his vocal versions of contemporary soul jazz and modal jazz favorites, including Bobby Timmons' "Dat Dere," Nat Adderley's "Work Song," Mongo Santamaria's "Afro-Blue" and Miles Davis' "All Blues." In each case, he provided memorable lyrics for the previously instrumental classics.

"He had a prodigious talent," says Joel Dorn, who produced "Sin and Soul -- And Then Some" (Sony/Legacy), an expanded reissue of Brown's 1960 landmark album. "He wasn't just a guy who put hip lyrics to jazz tunes. He also wrote his own songs, like the beautiful lullaby 'Brown Baby.' Or he'd take a Gwendolyn Brooks poem, 'Elegy to a Plain Black Boy,' and put his music to it. So he could do it all."

Brown's charming, non-threatening style onstage, which helped him attract racially mixed audiences, fell out of favor when a new generation of music reflecting militant black pride emerged by the mid-'60s.

Brown wrote and produced a number of plays for the stage, including "Joy," "Summer in the City," "Opportunity Please Knock" and a musical version of the comedy "Big Time Buck White," featuring Muhammad Ali in the lead role. None clicked.

Brown also worked with young performers. In 1968, he hosted a Gary, Ind., talent show that led to his discovery of the Jackson 5. In the '70s, Brown was an artist in residence at several colleges and starred in a Chicago-area production for CBS-affiliated WBBM-TV, "Oscar Brown Is Back in Town," which gained him two local Emmy Awards.

At the time of his death, he was also VP emeritus, poet in residence and director of spoken word and rap music for NETunes.


'Hogan's Heroes' Actor Leon Askin Dies
By DANICA KIRKA, Associated Press Writer
Fri Jun 3, 8:33 PM ET

Leon Askin, the actor who played Gen. Albert Burkhalter in the 1960s television comedy "Hogan's Heroes," has died, Austrian officials said Friday.

The actor was 97. Neither city officials nor the Vienna hospital where he died disclosed the cause or date of his death.

Askin was best known for his role as the Nazi general who constantly threatened to send the prisoner of war camp's inept commander, Col. Wilhelm Klink, to the Russian front because of his stupidity.

Born Leo Aschkenasy in Vienna on Sept. 18, 1907, Askin worked as a cabaret artist in the 1930s before fleeing first to France and then to the United States to escape persecution by the Nazis.

He had roles in dozens of films, including Billy Wilder's "One, two, three" and the Austrian director Fritz Lang's "Das Testament des Dr. Mabuse." In the course of his career, he appeared opposite Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton and Peter Ustinov.

Askin took up residence in Vienna in 1994, returning to his roots in cabaret. He also took roles in Vienna's Festwochen and the city's second opera, the Volksoper.

He was decorated with Vienna's Gold Medal of Honor, one of the most distinguished prizes the city offers.

"We have lost a huge actor and artist and a wonderful man," Mayor Michael Haeupl said in a statement.
_________________
"When I became a man, I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."- C.S. Lewis
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"Superman can't be emo. He can't cut himself."-CP
PostSat Jun 04, 2005 9:23 am
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Nobuyuki

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Well, back to it... Sad

Actress Anne Bancroft Dies at Age 73
By DINO HAZELL, Associated Press Writer
Tue Jun 7, 7:38 PM ET

Anne Bancroft, who won the 1962 best actress Oscar as the teacher of a young Helen Keller in "The Miracle Worker" but achieved greater fame as the seductive Mrs. Robinson in "The Graduate," has died. She was 73.

She died of uterine cancer on Monday at Mount Sinai Hospital, John Barlow, a spokesman for her husband, Mel Brooks, said Tuesday.

Bancroft was awarded the Tony for creating the role on Broadway of poor-sighted Annie Sullivan, the teacher of the deaf and blind Keller. She repeated her portrayal in the film version.

Yet despite her Academy Award and four other nominations, "The Graduate" overshadowed her other achievements.

Dustin Hoffman delivered the famous line when he realized his girlfriend's mother was coming on to him at her house: "Mrs. Robinson, you're trying to seduce me. Aren't you?"

Bancroft complained to a 2003 interviewer: "I am quite surprised that with all my work, and some of it is very, very good, that nobody talks about `The Miracle Worker.' We're talking about Mrs. Robinson. I understand the world. ... I'm just a little dismayed that people aren't beyond it yet."

Mike Nichols, who directed "The Graduate," called Bancroft a masterful performer.

"Her combination of brains, humor, frankness and sense were unlike any other artist," Nichols said in a statement. "Her beauty was constantly shifting with her roles, and because she was a consummate actress she changed radically for every part."

Her beginnings in Hollywood were unimpressive. She was signed by Twentieth Century-Fox in 1952 and given the glamour treatment. She had been acting in television as Anne Marno (her real name: Anna Maria Louise Italiano), but it sounded too ethnic for movies. The studio gave her a choice of names; she picked Bancroft "because it sounded dignified."

After a series of B pictures, she escaped to Broadway in 1958 and won her first Tony opposite Henry Fonda in "Two for the Seesaw." The stage and movie versions of "The Miracle Worker" followed. Her other Academy nominations: "The Pumpkin Eater" (1964); "The Graduate" (1967); "The Turning Point" (1977); "Agnes of God" (1985).

Bancroft became known for her willingness to assume a variety of portrayals. She appeared as Winston Churchill's American mother in TV's "Young Winston"; as Golda Meir in "Golda" onstage; a gypsy woman in the film "Love Potion No. 9"; and a centenarian for the TV version of "Oldest Living Confederate Widow Tells All."

After an unhappy three-year marriage to builder Martin May, Bancroft married comedian-director-producer Brooks in 1956. They met when she was rehearsing a musical number, "Married I Can Always Get," for the Perry Como television show, and a voice from offstage called: "I'm Mel Brooks."

In a 1984 interview she said she told her psychiatrist the next day: "Let's speed this process up — I've met the right man. See, I'd never had so much pleasure being with another human being. I wanted him to enjoy me too. It was that simple." A son, Maximilian, was born in 1972.

Bancroft appeared in three of Brooks' comedies: "Silent Movie," a remake of "To Be or Not to Be" and "Dracula: Dead and Loving It."

She also was the one who suggested that he make a stage musical of his movie "The Producers." She explained that when he was afraid of writing a full-blown musical, including the music, "I sent him to an analyst."

When Bancroft watched Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick rehearse "The Producers," she realized how much she had missed the theater. In 2002 she returned to Broadway for the first time since 1981, appearing in Edward Albee's "Occupant."

She was born Sept. 17, 1931, in the Bronx to Italian immigrant parents. She recalled scrawling "I want to be an actress" on the back fence of her flat when she was 9. Her father derided her ambitions, saying, "Who are we to dream these dreams?" Her mother was the dreamer, encouraging her daughter in 1958 to enroll at the American Academy for Dramatic Arts.

Live television drama was flourishing in New York in the early 1950s, and Bancroft appeared in 50 shows in two years. "It was the greatest school that one could go to," she said in 1997. "You learn to be concentrated and focused."

In mid-career Bancroft attended the Actors Studio to heighten her understanding of the acting craft. Later she studied at the American Film Institute's Directing Workshop for Women at UCLA. In 1980 she directed a feature, "Fatso," starring Dom DeLuise. It received modest attention.

Among her notable portrayals: a potential suicide in "The Slender Thread"; Mary Magdalene in Franco Zeffirelli's miniseries "Jesus of Nazareth"; actress Madge Kindle in "The Elephant Man"; Anthony Hopkins' pen pal in "84 Charing Cross Road"; feminist U.S. senator in "G.I. Jane"; the Miss Havisham role in a modernized "Great Expectations."

Despite all her memorable performances, Bancroft was remembered most for Mrs. Robinson. In 2003 she admitted that nearly everyone discouraged her from undertaking the role "because it was all about sex with a younger man." She viewed the character as having unfulfilled dreams and having been relegated to a conventional life with a conventional husband.

She added: "Film critics said I gave a voice to the fear we all have: that we'll reach a certain point in our lives, look around and realize that all the things we said we'd do and become will never come to be — and that we're ordinary."

Here's to you, Mrs. Robinson. *drinks*
_________________
"When I became a man, I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."- C.S. Lewis
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"Superman can't be emo. He can't cut himself."-CP
PostWed Jun 08, 2005 1:38 am
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Nobuyuki

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Dana Elcar was known for role on 'MacGyver'
By Valerie J. Nelson
Los Angeles Times
June 10, 2005

LOS ANGELES -- Dana Elcar, whose struggle with glaucoma and blindness was written into the character he was best known for portraying -- think-tank director Peter Thornton on ABC's "MacGyver" -- has died. He was 77.

Elcar died of complications from pneumonia Monday at Community Memorial Hospital in Ventura, his family announced.

Four seasons into playing a character on the adventure series that debuted in 1985, Elcar told producers that he was going blind.

They said, "The fact that you are losing your eyesight does not mean you have forgotten how to act," Elcar said in a 1991 speech to the National Federation of the Blind.
_________________
"When I became a man, I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."- C.S. Lewis
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"Superman can't be emo. He can't cut himself."-CP
PostSat Jun 11, 2005 1:36 am
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Nobuyuki

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Character Actor Lane Smith Dies

NORTHRIDGE — Longtime character actor Lane Smith, who played the small-town prosecutor in "My Cousin Vinny" and Richard Nixon in the TV movie "The Final Days," died of Lou Gehrig's disease, his wife said.
Television audiences may also remember Smith as Daily Planet editor Perry White in "Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman." Smith, 69, died yesterday morning at his Northridge home, Debbie Benedict Smith said.

"He was diagnosed last April and thank God it took him very quickly because there is absolutely nothing you can do with this disease," she said. "It is so hideous. My new campaign is to see if there's something to do for the cause."

Born April 29, 1936, in Memphis, Smith studied at the Actors Studio, which also counts Al Pacino and Dustin Hoffman among its alumni. He appeared in the original stage production of "Glengarry Glen Ross" and portrayed McMurphy in the revival of "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest."

In films, he played characters ranging from a crooked congressman opposite Eddie Murphy in "The Distinguished Gentleman" to a hockey coach in "The Mighty Ducks" to Nick Nolte's cellmate in "Weeds." He also played the farm- town father opposite Pauly Shore in "Son-in-Law."

Additional film credits include "The Legend of Bagger Vance," "The Scout," "Air America," "Prison," "Places in the Heart" and "Red Dawn."
_________________
"When I became a man, I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."- C.S. Lewis
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"Superman can't be emo. He can't cut himself."-CP
PostWed Jun 15, 2005 1:12 am
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Nobuyuki

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Jack Kilby, integrated circuit pioneer, dead at 81
By Tom Krazit, IDG News Service

Jack Kilby, whose work in the late 1950s on the integrated circuit paved the way for the modern computing era, died Monday in Dallas at the age of 81 after a brief struggle against cancer, Texas Instruments Inc. (TI) announced Tuesday.

The Nobel Prize-winning engineer developed one of the first integrated circuits, a collection of transistors organized to work on computing tasks. Kilby and TI built an integrated circuit in 1958, and filed for a patent for the device in 1959, a few months before Intel Corp. co-founder Robert Noyce also filed for an integrated circuit patent while employed by Fairchild Semiconductor Corp.

Fairchild and TI eventually settled their legal differences over the creation of the first integrated circuit and cross-licensed their technologies, allowing the semiconductor industry to flourish.

But Kilby was also responsible for several other groundbreaking inventions while employed by TI, including a handheld electronic calculator and a thermal printer, TI said in a release.

“Jack was one of the true pioneers of the semiconductor industry,? said TI President and Chief Executive Officer Rich Templeton, in the release. “Every engineer, myself included, owes no small part of their livelihood to the work Jack Kilby did here at Texas Instruments. We will miss him.?

Kilby worked for TI from 1958 to 1983, holding several management positions over his tenure. He was also a professor at Texas A&M University from 1978 to 1984.

He received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2000 for his contributions to the development of the integrated circuit.


And without the works he and others contributed to all those years ago, we probably wouldn't be here reading about him like this.
Thanks, Jack. Cool
_________________
"When I became a man, I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."- C.S. Lewis
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"Superman can't be emo. He can't cut himself."-CP
PostTue Jun 21, 2005 6:34 pm
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TeenCrusader4

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Well here's an R.I.P. to Jack. Thank you Jack. I learned a little about you in a little bit of paragraphs. I always ask a dead person this so here it goes, how does it feel to be old ? ANd I never get an answer. I know that I want this question answered but I forget to ask really old people.. Oh sorry. What I meant to say was really aged senoir citizen !! That was hard.. Well anyway I don't think this young lady will ever get the chance to know what old feels until a really really long time.
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You came from the sky, right! From up there. - Unknown. Might be from The Gundam Series.

It already has begun, and there is no stopping what is meant to be. Raven- The End - Teen Titans

Idiots do cool things, that's why it's cool.-FLCL
PostTue Jun 21, 2005 9:08 pm
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Nobuyuki

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Paul Winchell, Voice of Tigger, Dies at 82
Associated Press
Sun Jun 26, 8:38 AM ET

Paul Winchell, a ventriloquist, inventor and children's TV show host best known for creating the lispy voice of Winnie the Pooh's animated friend Tigger, has died. He was 82.

Winchell died Friday morning in his sleep at his Moorpark home, Burt Du Brow, a television producer and close family friend, told the Los Angeles Times.

Over six decades, Winchell was a master ventriloquist — bringing dummies Jerry Mahoney and Knucklehead Smiff to life on television — and an inventor who held 30 patents, including one for an early artificial heart he built in 1963.

But he was perhaps best known for his work as the voice of the lovable tiger in animated versions of A.A. Milne's "Winnie the Pooh" — with his trademark "T-I-double grrrr-R."

Winchell first voiced Tigger in 1968 for Disney's "Winnie the Pooh and the Blustery Day," which won an Academy Award for best animated short film, and continued to do so through 1999's "Winnie the Pooh: Seasons of Giving."

Winchell voiced memorable characters in numerous animated features over the years for Disney and Hanna Barbera. He was Gargamel in "The Smurfs," and Boomer in "The Fox and the Hound."

Winchell said he always tried to look for characteristics and idiosyncrasies in the voices he created. For Tigger, he created a slight lisp and a laugh. He credited his wife, who is British, for giving him the inspiration for Tigger's signature phrase: TTFN. TA-TA for now.

In 1974, he earned a Grammy for best children's recording with "The Most Wonderful Things About Tiggers" from the feature "Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too."

At the age of 13, Winchell was a winner on radio's "Amateur Hour" for doing his imitation of Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy. Ventriloquist Bergen was his childhood hero, and Winchell said one of the greatest thrills of his life was a joint appearance with Bergen on the game show "Masquerade Party."

Winchell made his television debut in 1947 with a smart-mouthed puppet he had invented in his early teens, and within a year was host of "The Bigelow Show." He was also host of a number of children's shows, including "The Paul Winchell-Jerry Mahoney Show" and "Circus Time."

In 1950, Winchell created Knucklehead Smiff and introduced him on "The Spiedel Show," which later became "What's My Name?"

Despite his success in television, Winchell felt the medium did not do justice to his beloved craft.

"Ventriloquism today is in a slump," he told the AP. "I think television defeats ventriloquism. Children are so used to seeing puppets that when they see a real ventriloquist they don't understand it. On television, everyone talks and they don't care about the mechanics."

Winchell's dummies are now at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington.

Winchell was born in New York City on Dec. 21, 1922. He contracted polio at age six and overcame speech impediments as he learned to throw his own voice.

Winchell attended Columbia University and also studied and practiced acupuncture and hypnosis and became a prolific inventor.

He donated his early artificial heart to the University of Utah for research. Dr. Robert Jarvik and other researchers at the university went on to build an artificial heart, dubbed the Jarvik-7, which was implanted into patients after 1982.

Among Winchell's other patents: a disposable razor, a flameless cigarette lighter and an invisible garter belt.

Winchell is survived by his wife of 31 years, the former Jean Freeman; five children and three grandchildren.
_________________
"When I became a man, I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."- C.S. Lewis
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"Superman can't be emo. He can't cut himself."-CP
PostSun Jun 26, 2005 5:15 pm
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FinalDivineDragoon

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Nobu I think we should just call you TIL's Grim Reaper from now on Wink
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PostMon Jun 27, 2005 2:37 pm
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Fodder

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Well the grim reaper needs to update death two from Winnie the poof. Today Piglett's voice died.
PostMon Jun 27, 2005 3:36 pm
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Nobuyuki

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FinalDivineDragoon wrote:
Nobu I think we should just call you TIL's Grim Reaper from now on Wink

I would gladly hand this task back to JohnnyPsycho if he'd just return. He has the ghoulish sense of humor needed to make these interesting. Wink

Fodder wrote:
Well the grim reaper needs to update death two from Winnie the poof. Today Piglett's voice died.

1. I've been at work all day.

2. Aw, crap. Sad I liked him.
_________________
"When I became a man, I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."- C.S. Lewis
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"Superman can't be emo. He can't cut himself."-CP
PostMon Jun 27, 2005 6:02 pm
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Fodder

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Well since your watching your childhood fading away I can take over. Im always watching CNN and my local radio stations websites. If you have somewhere else you watch let me know.

I know its morbid but I have no problem doing it
PostMon Jun 27, 2005 6:54 pm
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Nobuyuki

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Anyone can do it, I'm just not sure they're interested...

John Fiedler, 80, Stage Actor and Film Voice of Pooh's Piglet, Dies
By MICHELLE O'DONNELL, New York Times

John Fiedler, who played character roles in celebrated dramas on Broadway and in Hollywood but gained lasting fame among young audiences as the voice of Piglet in Walt Disney's Winnie-the-Pooh films, died on Saturday. He was 80.

His death was confirmed by his brother, James.

Mr. Fiedler had appeared in the Broadway production of "A Raisin in the Sun" and had played a juror on film in the drama "Twelve Angry Men" when, in the 1960's, his voice earned him the role of Piglet, the kind-hearted worrier who is Winnie-the-Pooh's best friend.

"Walt Disney heard it on a program and said, 'That's Piglet,' " James Fiedler recalled.

John Fiedler's natural speaking voice was higher than most men's, his brother said, but he still had to raise it considerably to achieve the high-pitch of the little pink pig. Mr. Fiedler continued to play this part in later life, most recently this year in "Pooh's Heffalump Movie"; last year, he did "Winnie-the-Pooh: Springtime with Roo," and in 2003, "Piglet's Big Movie."

John Donald Fiedler was born Feb. 3, 1925 in Platteville, a small town in southwestern Wisconsin, and was the oldest of three children born to Donald and Margaret Fiedler. When he was 5, his father, a salesman, moved the family to Shorewood, a suburb of Milwaukee.

There, John's love of acting bloomed, his brother said. He staged productions in the family's garage and cast them with neighborhood children.

He graduated from Shorewood High School in 1943 and enlisted in the United States Navy, serving stateside until World War II's end. He made his way to New York City the following year, his brother said, and joined the Neighborhood Playhouse.

In 1954, he landed the part of Medvedenko in "The Sea Gull" starring Montgomery Clift and Judith Evelyn Off Broadway at the Phoenix Theater. That was followed by the Broadway productions of "A Raisin in the Sun" with Sidney Poitier and "The Odd Couple" starring Walter Matthau and Art Carney. Many of his characters had meek demeanors that were belied by a tough, even mean streak.

He landed character parts in movies, including "True Grit" with John Wayne and "That Touch of Mink" with Cary Grant. In addition, he played parts on television series, including "Star Trek" and "The Bob Newhart Show," in which he was Mr. Peterson, the bashful patient who was always henpecked by his wife.

Mr. Fiedler said that his brother approached the part of Piglet with as much enthusiasm as his other roles, as it was simply a chance to act.

In addition to his brother, who lives in Madison, Wis., Mr. Fiedler is survived by a sister, Mary Dean of Milwaukee, and numerous nieces and nephews.
_________________
"When I became a man, I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."- C.S. Lewis
Wink
"Superman can't be emo. He can't cut himself."-CP
PostMon Jun 27, 2005 7:57 pm
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SOUL SUPERSTAR LUTHER VANDROSS DEAD AT 54

Soul star LUTHER VANDROSS has died at the age of 54.

The GIVE ME THE REASON singer never fully recovered from a massive stroke in April 2003, which left him in a coma.

Further details of his death remained sketchy as WENN went to press.

A revered balladeer, Vandross was a backing singer for stars like DAVID BOWIE, BETTE MIDLER and BARBRA STREISAND until he funded his own solo album, NEVER TOO MUCH in 1981.

His debut went on to sell millions of copies, turning the velvet-voiced soul man into an international superstar.

His romantic hits, like ANY LOVE, I REALLY DIDN'T MEAN IT and HERE + NOW, continued to make Vandross a big name throughout the 1980s and 1990s, while he struggled with poor health and weight problems in private.

He once claimed in a US TV interview he had lost "approximately" 120 pounds 14 times in his life. He suffered from diabetes and high blood pressure.

His last major success came with the hit 2003 album DANCE WITH MY FATHER, which he recorded just before his stroke. The album won him four of his eight Grammy Awards.

As well as recording a host of hits, Vandross also produced ARETHA FRANKLIN and duetted with JANET JACKSON on THE BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE FREE and MARIAH CAREY on a remake of romantic classic ENDLESS LOVE.
_________________
"When I became a man, I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."- C.S. Lewis
Wink
"Superman can't be emo. He can't cut himself."-CP
PostSat Jul 02, 2005 11:29 pm
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Nobuyuki

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Norman Prescott, R.I.P.
Chairman of Filmation Studios
By VARIETY STAFF

Norman Prescott, chairman, co-founder and exec producer at Filmation Studios, died July 2 of natural causes in Los Angeles. He was 78.

Boston native and Air Force veteran Prescott started as a popular radio personality in his hometown, becoming program director at WORL at 21.

In 1952, he founded the Norm Prescott School of Broadcasting, later renamed the Northeast Broadcasting School and currently the New England Institute of Art, located in Brookline, Mass.

In 1959, Joseph E. Levine appointed him vice president of music, merchandising and post-production at newly formed Embassy Pictures Corp. His first assignment was to supervise the music and post-production for the motion picture "Hercules."

Two years later, he independently produced his first full-length animated feature, "Pinocchio in Outer Space," released through Universal. That was followed by "Journey Back to Oz," featuring the voice of Liza Minelli as Dorothy.

He teamed with Lou Scheimer to start Filmation Studios in 1965. He acquired the rights from National Periodicals to produce the "Superman" animated series, which led to Filmation's first big success.

Filmation went on to garner two Emmy noms in 1974 for the animated series "Star Trek" and "Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids." The following year, "Star Trek" took home the laurel.

Other Filmation successes in children's programming include the toons "The Archies," "Batman," "Tarzan,""Flash Gordon" and many more. "Plus, live-action shows include "Shazam," "Isis," "Ark II" and "Space Academy."

A listing of all Filmation productions.
_________________
"When I became a man, I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."- C.S. Lewis
Wink
"Superman can't be emo. He can't cut himself."-CP
PostThu Jul 07, 2005 5:22 pm
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