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  Toonami Infolink :: View topic - Dead Celebrity Roundup (2005-2006 Editon) :(
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Dead Celebrity Roundup (2005-2006 Editon) :(
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Nobuyuki

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Post subject: Dead Celebrity Roundup (2005-2006 Editon) :(
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Since our resident Grim Reaper JohnnyPsycho hasn't been seen for months, I guess I'll volunteer to start things off...although I hate to (esp. with this one):

Late-Night King Johnny Carson Dies at 79
By LYNN ELBER, AP Television Writer


LOS ANGELES - Johnny Carson (news), the quick-witted "Tonight Show" host who became a national institution putting his viewers to bed for 30 years with a smooth nightcap of celebrity banter and heartland charm, died Sunday. He was 79.
Carson died early Sunday morning, according to his nephew, Jeff Sotzing. "He was surrounded by his family, whose loss will be immeasurable," Sotzing told The Associated Press.
He did not provide further details, but NBC said Carson died of emphysema at his Malibu home.
The boyish-looking Nebraska native with the disarming grin, who survived every attempt to topple him from his late-night talk show throne, was a star who managed never to distance himself from his audience.
His wealth, the adoration of his guests — particularly the many young comics whose careers he launched — the wry tales of multiple divorces: Carson's air of modesty made it all serve to enhance his bedtime intimacy with viewers.
"Heeeeere's Johnny!" was the booming announcement from sidekick Ed McMahon that ushered Carson out to the stage. Then the formula: the topical monologue, the guests, the broadly played skits such as "Carnac the Magnificent."
But America never tired of him; Carson went out on top when he retired in May 1992.
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Last edited by Nobuyuki on Sun Feb 05, 2006 9:24 am; edited 1 time in total
PostSun Jan 23, 2005 6:31 pm
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Chibi_Zero

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I heard late this afternoon about this Sad
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PostSun Jan 23, 2005 7:35 pm
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Zechs

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Honestly I never saw a single full episode of the show. Went off just before my time. Still from things I've seen he was a pioneer for the Late Night Talk Show, his model is followed still by all the other the others.

Oh and shouldn't we have mentioned Will Eisner?
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PostSun Jan 23, 2005 10:51 pm
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Nobuyuki

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Zechs wrote:
Oh and shouldn't we have mentioned Will Eisner?

Maybe, but Andro did have it on the front page already.
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PostSun Jan 23, 2005 11:01 pm
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ROBRAM89

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He quit when I was three...but I still got a horrible feeling throughout my entire body when I heard this. This loss is terrible indeed.
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PostSun Jan 23, 2005 11:01 pm
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Fodder

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I read about it this morning and I felt real sorry for his family. I think it hit a lot of us harder since the news of his sending in monologue bits to letterman was still fresh in our heads.
PostMon Jan 24, 2005 12:42 am
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darkness88

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The guy from UPN's smash hit series Moesha just died. His name is Lamont Bentley and he played Moesha's boyfriend/best friend Hakeem, on the show.
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PostTue Jan 25, 2005 12:07 pm
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Alshoff

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darkness88 wrote:
The guy from UPN's smash hit series Moesha just died. His name is Lamont Bentley and he played Moesha's boyfriend/best friend Hakeem, on the show.


Nobody's crying because nobody watches UPN.
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PostTue Jan 25, 2005 7:24 pm
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dougisfunny

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Moesha was on other channels before UPN
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PostTue Jan 25, 2005 7:45 pm
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John_Bono_Smithy_Satchmo

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Am I the only one not saddened about Johnny Carson's death? I mean, he lived a full life, contributed greatly to society before he passed, and died peacefully. It's not as if creul fate robbed us of a great talent. Yeah sure, there's a time of mourning for family members and anyone that knew him on a personal level, but none of us fall under that category, and people tend to accept that a person in their life will eventually die.
It's not a sudden shock, it's not out of the ordinary, it's just life--or at least the last part of it.
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PostTue Jan 25, 2005 11:57 pm
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dougisfunny

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Well, no its normal enough.
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The problem with America is stupidity. I'm not saying there should be a capital punishment for stupidity, but why don't we just take the safety labels off of everything and let the problem solve itself?
PostWed Jan 26, 2005 12:28 am
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Nobuyuki

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Philip Johnson, the innovative architect who promoted the “glass box? skyscraper and then smashed the mold with daringly nostalgic post-modernist designs, has died. He was 98.

Johnson died Tuesday night at his home in New Canaan, Conn., according to Joel S. Ehrenkranz, his lawyer. John Elderfield, a curator at the Museum of Modern Art, also confirmed the death Wednesday.

Johnson’s work ranged from the severe modernism of his New Canaan home, a glass cube in the woods, to the Chippendale-topped AT&T Building in New York City, now owned by Sony.

He and his partner, John Burgee, designed the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove, Calif., an ecclesiastical greenhouse that is wider and higher than Notre Dame in Paris; the Bank of America building in Houston, a 56-story tower of pink granite stepped back in a series of Dutch gable roofs; and the Cleveland Playhouse, a complex with the feel of an 11th century town.

“Architecture is basically the design of interiors, the art of organizing interior space,? Johnson said in a 1965 interview.

He expressed a loathing for buildings that are “slide-rule boxes for maximum return of rent,? and once said his great ambition was “to build the greatest room in the world — a great theater or cathedral or monument. Nobody’s given me the job.?

In 1980, however, he completed his great room, the Crystal Cathedral. If architects are remembered for their one-room buildings, Johnson said, “This may be it for me.?

He got even more attention with the AT&T Building in New York City, breaking decisively with the glass towers that crowded Manhattan. He created a granite-walled tower with an enormous 90-foot arched entryway and a fanciful top that seemed more appropriate for a piece of furniture.

The building generated controversy, but it marked a sharp turn in architectural taste away from the severity of modernism. Other architects felt emboldened to experiment with styles, and commissions poured into the offices of Johnson-Burgee.

Most were corporate palaces: the Transco II and Bank of America towers in Houston; a 23-story neo-Victorian office building in San Francisco, graced with three human figures at the summit; a mock-gothic glass tower for PPG Industries in Pittsburgh.

“The people with money to build today are corporations — they are our popes and Medicis,? Johnson said. “The sense of pride is why they build.?

But his large projects at times ran into a buzz saw of criticism from local preservationists and even fellow architects. In 1987, he was replaced as designer of the second phase of the New England Life Insurance Co. headquarters in Boston after residents complained about the project’s size and style.

Critics unearthed a quotation he had made at a conference a couple of years earlier: that “I am a whore and I am paid very well for high-rise buildings.? Johnson said later his choice of words was unfortunate and he only meant that architects need to be able to compromise with developers if they want to see them built.


Philip Cortelyou Johnson was born July 8, 1906, in Cleveland, the only son of Homer H. Johnson, a well-to-do attorney, and his wife, Louise. After graduating with honors from Harvard in 1927 with a degree in philosophy, he toured Europe and became interested in new styles of architecture.

That interest became his life’s work in 1932, when Johnson was appointed chairman of the department of architecture of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. That same year, he mounted an influential exhibition, “The International Style: Architecture 1922-1932.?

Johnson was especially enthusiastic about the work of the German architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, who called for designs that express a building’s structure in the most direct and economical way possible. Under such a doctrine, if a building is supported by steel columns, they should be left visible instead of being masked behind stone or brick.

In 1940, Johnson entered the Graduate School of Design at Harvard, studying under Marcel Breuer and testing some theories in a controversial house built in Cambridge, Mass., in 1943. After a stint in the Army Corps of Engineers, he returned to the Museum of Modern Art, designing its west wing in 1951 and the sculpture garden in 1953. He left in 1955 to open his own design office.

Johnson worked with his hero by designing the interiors for Mies’ influential Seagram Building on New York’s Park Avenue, which was completed in 1958.

Johnson’s New Canaan home was built in 1949, a triangular arrangement on a three-level site that won the Silver Medal from the Architectural League of New York in 1950.

Johnson was awarded the Gold Medal of the American Institute of Architects in 1978, and the following year he became the first recipient of the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize. He was an astute collector of art; what he didn’t have room to display at home, he gave to the Museum of Modern Art.

Toward the end of his life, Johnson went public with some private matters — his homosexuality and his past as a disciple of Hitler-style fascism. On the latter, he said he spent much time in Berlin in the 1930s and became “fascinated with power,? but added he did not consider that an excuse.

“I have no excuse (for) such utter, unbelievable stupidity. ... I don’t know how you expiate guilt,? he says.

He blamed his homosexuality for causing a nervous breakdown while he was a student at Harvard and said that in 1977 he asked the New Yorker magazine to omit references to it in a profile, fearing he might lose the AT&T commission, which he called “the job of my life.?

In the 1950s, Johnson reflected on his career and what he hoped to achieve.

“I like the thought that what we are to do on this earth is embellish it for its greater beauty,? he said, “so that oncoming generations can look back to the shapes we leave here and get the same thrill that I get in looking back at theirs — at the Parthenon, at Chartres Cathedral.?
_________________
"When I became a man, I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."- C.S. Lewis
Wink
"Superman can't be emo. He can't cut himself."-CP
PostWed Jan 26, 2005 6:04 pm
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Nobuyuki

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OK, nobody cares about architecture, but this hits closer:

Actor John Vernon of 'Animal House' Dies
Thu Feb 3, 7:48 PM ET
By LYNN ELBER, AP Television Writer

LOS ANGELES - John Vernon, a stage-trained character actor who played cunning villains in film and TV and made his comedy mark as Dean Wormer in "National Lampoon's Animal House," has died. He was 72.

Vernon died at home in his sleep Tuesday following complications from Jan. 16 heart surgery, his daughter, Kate Vernon, said Thursday.

The Canadian-born actor found satisfaction in his varied career, his daughter said.

"He loved the comedy that he was able to do, but his training was in drama and he really enjoyed the dramatic roles," she said.

Movie fans may know him best for his role in "Animal House" as Dean Wormer, who is bent on expelling the hard-partying Delta fraternity house. The movie, starring John Belushi (news) and Tim Matheson, is one of the most popular comedies ever made.

Born in 1932 in Montreal, Vernon studied at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London. He did repertory work in England and was heard off-screen as the voice of Big Brother in the 1956 film "1984."

He returned to Canada to appear on stage and on television, including the starring role in the 1960s drama "Wojeck," in which he played a coroner.

"John was superb. He really knew how to use the camera, and vocally he was just born to have a mike nearby," Ted Follows, his co-star in "Wojeck," told The Canadian Press.

After appearing on Broadway in "Royal Hunt of the Sun" he became a steady player in U.S. films, making his debut in director John Boorman's "Point Blank" (1967) as a turncoat tossed to his death by Lee Marvin.

Vernon went on to work with other celebrated filmmakers including Alfred Hitchcock ("Topaz," 1969); Don Siegel ("Dirty Harry," 1971), and Clint Eastwood (news) ("The Outlaw Josey Wales," 1976).

His deep, menacing voice was custom-made for the many bad guys he played.

He reprised his role in "National Lampoon's Animal House" in the TV spinoff "Delta House" (1979). Other comedy roles followed, including the part of Mr. Big in the film "I'm Gonna Git You Sucka" in 1988.

Vernon appeared in a DVD edition of "Animal House" as part of a satiric update on the characters. Wormer was portrayed as a curmudgeonly old man in a wheelchair.


P.S. - Batman:The Animated Series fans should remember him best for his portrayal of crime boss Rupert Thorne. - Nobu
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"When I became a man, I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."- C.S. Lewis
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"Superman can't be emo. He can't cut himself."-CP
PostFri Feb 04, 2005 12:39 am
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Nobuyuki

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Ossie Davis found dead in Miami hotel room

87-year-old actor, along with wife, also civil rights advocate
The Associated Press
Updated: 6:10 p.m. ET Feb. 4, 2005

NEW YORK - Ossie Davis, whose rich baritone and elegant, unshakable bearing made him a giant of the stage, screen and the civil rights movement — often in tandem with his wife, Ruby Dee — has died. He was 87.

Davis was found dead Friday in his hotel room in Miami Beach, Fla., according to officials there. He was making a film, “Retirement,? said Arminda Thomas, who works in his New Rochelle office and confirmed the death.

Miami Beach police spokesman Bobby Hernandez said Davis’ grandson called shortly before 7 a.m. when Davis would not open the door to his room at the Shore Club Hotel. Davis was found dead, apparently of natural causes, Hernandez said.

Davis wrote, acted, directed and produced for the theater and Hollywood. Even light fare such as the comedy “Grumpy Old Men? with Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau was somehow enriched by his strong, but gentle presence. Davis and Dee celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in 1998 with the publication of a dual autobiography, “With Ossie & Ruby: In This Life Together.?

Their partnership rivaled the achievements of other celebrated performing couples, such as Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy. Davis and Dee first appeared together in the plays “Jeb,? in 1946, and “Anna Lucasta,? in 1946-47. Davis’ first film, “No Way Out? in 1950, was Dee’s fifth.

Both had key roles in the TV series “Roots: The Next Generation? (1978), “Martin Luther King: The Dream and the Drum? (1986) and “The Stand? (1994). Davis appeared in several Spike Lee films, including “Do the Right Thing? and “Jungle Fever,? in which Dee also appeared.

Davis had a guest role as the father of two women characters in Showtime’s dramatic series, “The L Word.? He appeared in one episode in the first season, then returned for three episodes for the season about to begin, where his character takes ill and dies.

“We knew that we were working with a powerful, important actor,? executive producer Ilene Chaiken said Friday. “Ruby Dee sat with me and watched as he filmed his death scene. It was extraordinary.?

Among Davis’ more notable Broadway appearances was his portrayal of the title character in “Purlie Victorious? (1961), a comedy he wrote lampooning racial stereotypes. In it, he played a conniving preacher who sets out to buy a church in rural Georgia. In 1970, Davis co-wrote the book for “Purlie,? a musical version of the play. A revival of the musical is planned for Broadway next season.

“He’s my hero,? actor Alan Alda, who appeared in “Purlie Victorious,? wrote in e-mail to The Associated Press. “I am sorry for his family and for all of us who have benefited from ... his art and from his service to his country.?

Actors’ Equity Association issued a statement Friday calling Davis “an icon in the American theater? and he and Dee “American treasures.? House lights for Broadway marquees were to be dimmed Friday at curtain time.

In 2004, Davis and Dee were among the artists selected to receive the Kennedy Center Honors.

“His greatness as a human being went far beyond his excellence as an actor,? former New York Governor Mario Cuomo said Friday. “Ossie was a citizen of the country, first, and the world. He and his wife were activists and they took it seriously.?

Dee was in New Zealand making a movie at the time of Davis’ death, said his agent, Michael Livingston.

When not on stage or on camera, Davis and Dee were deeply involved in civil rights issues and efforts to promote the cause of blacks in the entertainment industry. In 1963, Davis participated in the landmark March on Washington. Two years later, he delivered a memorable eulogy for his slain friend, Malcolm X, whom Davis praised as “our own black shining prince? and “our living, black manhood!?

“In honoring him, we honor the best in ourselves,? said Davis, who reprised his eulogy in a voice-over for the 1992 Spike Lee film, “Malcolm X.?

Davis directed several films, most notably “Cotton Comes to Harlem? (1970). Other films include “The Cardinal? (1963), “The Client? (1994) and “I’m Not Rappaport? (1996), a reprise of his stage role 10 years earlier.

On TV, he appeared in “The Emperor Jones? (1955), “Miss Evers’ Boys? (1997) and “Twelve Angry Men? (1997). He was a cast member on “The Defenders? from 1963-65, and “Evening Shade? from 1990-94, among other shows.

“Since the loss of my father, no man has come close to represent the kind of man I hope to be some day,? said Burt Reynolds, Davis’ “Evening Shade? co-star. “I know he’s sitting next to God now, and I know God envies that voice.?

Davis had just started his new movie on Monday, Livingston said. “Retirement,? a comedy about an elderly group of friends, also starred Jack Warden, Peter Falk and George Segal.

The oldest of five children, Davis was born in tiny Cogdell, Ga., in 1917, and grew up in nearby Waycross and Valdosta. He left home in 1935, hitchhiking to Washington, D.C., to enter Howard University, where he studied drama, intending to be a playwright.

His career as an actor began in 1939 with the Rose McClendon Players in Harlem, then the center of black culture in America. There, the young Davis met or mingled with some of the most influential figures of the time, including the preacher Father Divine, W.E.B. DuBois, A. Philip Randolph, Langston Hughes and Richard Wright.

He also had what he described in the book as a “flirtation with the Young Communist League,? which he said essentially ended with the onset of World War II. Davis spent nearly four years in service, mainly as a surgical technician in an Army hospital in Liberia, serving both wounded troops and local inhabitants.

Back in New York in 1946, Davis debuted on Broadway in “Jeb,? a play about a returning soldier. His co-star was Dee, whose budding stage career had paralleled his own. They had even appeared in different productions of the same play, “On Strivers Row,? in 1940.

In December 1948, on a day off from rehearsals from another play, Davis and Dee took a bus to New Jersey to get married. They already were so close that “it felt almost like an appointment we finally got around to keeping,? Dee wrote in “In This Life Together.?

As black performers, they found themselves caught up in the social unrest fomented by the then-new Cold War and the growing debate over social and racial justice.

“We young ones in the theater, trying to fathom even as we followed, were pulled this way and that by the swirling currents of these new dimensions of the Struggle,? Davis wrote in the joint autobiography.

He lined up with socialist reformer DuBois and singer Paul Robeson, remaining fiercely loyal to the singer even after Robeson was denounced by other black political, sports and show business figures for his openly communist and pro-Soviet sympathies.

While Hollywood and, to a lesser extent, the New York theater world became engulfed in McCarthyism controversies, Davis and Dee emerged from the anti-communist fervor unscathed.

“We’ve never been, to our knowledge, guilty of anything — other than being black — that might upset anybody,? he wrote.

They were friends with baseball star Jackie Robinson — Dee played his wife, opposite Robinson himself, in the 1950 movie “The Jackie Robinson Story? — and with Malcolm X.

In the book, Davis told how a prior commitment caused them to miss the Harlem rally where Malcolm was assassinated in 1965. Davis delivered the eulogy at Malcolm’s funeral, calling him “our own black shining prince — who didn’t hesitate to die, because he loved us so.? He reprised it in a voice-over for the 1992 Spike Lee film, “Malcolm X.?

Along with film, stage and television, the couple’s careers extended to a radio show, “The Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee Story Hour,? that ran on 65 stations for four years in the mid-1970s, featuring a mix of black themes.

Both made numerous guest appearances on television shows.
_________________
"When I became a man, I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."- C.S. Lewis
Wink
"Superman can't be emo. He can't cut himself."-CP
PostFri Feb 04, 2005 10:30 pm
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Nobuyuki

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Playwright Arthur Miller dies at 89

By JOHN CHRISTOFFERSEN
Associated Press Writer

ROXBURY, Conn. (AP) -- Arthur Miller, the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright whose most famous fictional creation, Willy Loman in "Death of a Salesman," came to symbolize the American Dream gone awry, has died. He was 89.

Miller, who had been hailed as America's greatest living playwright, died Thursday night at his home in Roxbury of congestive heart failure, his assistant, Julia Bolus, said Friday. She declined to give details on his illness. His family was at his bedside when he died, she said.

His plays, with their strong emphasis on family, morality and personal responsibility, spoke to the growing fragmentation of American society.

"A lot of my work goes to the center of where we belong - if there is any root to life - because nowadays the family is broken up, and people don't live in the same place for very long," Miller said in a 1988 interview.

"Dislocation, maybe, is part of our uneasiness. It implants the feeling that nothing is really permanent."

Playwright Edward Albee said Miller had paid him a compliment, saying "that my plays were `necessary.' I will go one step further and say that Arthur's plays are `essential.'"

Miller's career was marked by early success. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for "Death of a Salesman" in 1949, when he was just 33 years old.

His marriage to Marilyn Monroe in 1956 further catapulted the playwright to fame, though that was publicity he said he never pursued.

In a 1992 interview with a French newspaper, he called her "highly self-destructive" and said that during their marriage, "all my energy and attention were devoted to trying to help her solve her problems. Unfortunately, I didn't have much success."

"Death of a Salesman," which took Miller only six weeks to write, earned rave reviews when it opened on Broadway in February 1949, directed by Elia Kazan.

The story of Willy Loman, a man destroyed by his own stubborn belief in the glory of American capitalism and the redemptive power of success, was made into a movie and staged all over the world.

"I couldn't have predicted that a work like `Death of a Salesman' would take on the proportions it has," Miller said in 1988. "Originally, it was a literal play about a literal salesman, but it has become a bit of a myth, not only here but in many other parts of the world."

In 1999, 50 years after it won the Tony Award as best play, "Death of a Salesman" won the Tony for best revival of the Broadway season. The show also won the top acting prize for Brian Dennehy, who played Loman.

Miller, then 83, received a lifetime achievement award.

"Just being around to receive it is a pleasure," he joked to the audience during the awards ceremony.

Miller won the New York Drama Critics' Circle's best play award twice in the 1940s, for "All My Sons" in 1947 and for "Death of a Salesman." In 1953, he received a Tony Award for "The Crucible," a play about mass hysteria during the Salem witch trials that was inspired by the repressive political environment of McCarthyism.

That play, still read by thousands of American high-school students each year, is Miller's most frequently performed work.
_________________
"When I became a man, I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up."- C.S. Lewis
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"Superman can't be emo. He can't cut himself."-CP
PostFri Feb 11, 2005 3:01 pm
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